Nation

India develops AESA radar to improve the lethality of IAF planes

0
AESA

Electronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE) project head D Seshagiri corroborated this, claiming that the produced AESA radar is 95 percent indigenous, with only one imported subsystem.

The Indian Air Force (IAF) will demonstrate the use of an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar developed in-house later this month, making India one of the few countries with an indigenous force multiplier that is used in electronic warfare, long-range missiles, and long-range, precision-guided ammunition. Electronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE) project head D Seshagiri corroborated this, claiming that the produced AESA radar is 95 percent indigenous, with only one imported subsystem. It can track 50 targets in the sky at a range of more than 100 kilometers and engage four of them at the same time. 

This radar will be installed on all 83 Tejas Mark I A aircraft in the Indian Air Force over the next five years, as well as the future twin-engine AMCA fighter designed by the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA). According to Seshagiri, the AESA radar will be installed on the radar cones of Indian military Su-30 MKI aircraft as well as carrier-based MiG-29 K fighters. “The LRDE has already signed an MoU with Hindustan Aeronautics Limited for Hindustan Aeronautics Limited to be the lead integrator of the radar on the Tejas Mk I A, with four recognized vendors, including BEL, as essential sub-system suppliers.”

According to HT, the first 16 Tejas MK 1A aircraft would be equipped with Israeli ELM 2052 AESA radars, while the remaining aircraft will be equipped with the indigenous Uttam AESA radar. “The radar has already been tested for over 250 hours on two Tejas fighters and a Hawker Siddeley 800 executive jet.” This month, the radar will fly for the first time, with the force multiplier ready for manufacturing. Only the United States, the European Union, Israel, and China have AESA radar capacity, according to Seshagiri. The radar has already been approved by the National Flight Testing Centre, which is manned by the IAF, following satisfactory performance tests. Previously, India’s fighters and indigenous airborne warning and control systems planes used primary radars. If Indian pilots had AESA radars placed aboard intercepting fighters, the Pakistani Air Force’s response to the Balakot strike in February 2019 would have been costly for Islamabad.

Continue Reading on Spot Latest

Team SL

Shastri defends Kohli’s captaincy decision by citing Gavaskar & Tendulkar examples

Previous article

‘Mountains can’t block the river,’ China says on Australia’s decision to boycott Olympics

Next article

You may also like

Comments

Leave a Reply

More in Nation